ENT problems

Lifestyle Changes for Better Hearing

Lifestyle Changes for Better Hearing

 

When people talk about lifestyle changes the things that come to mind are dieting to lose weight, quitting smoking and financial management, but you can take the same approach and protect your hearing. The thing about hearing protection is that it’s so easy to do provided you’re willing to carry through.

 

Know the Signs of Hearing Loss

Signs of hearing loss include straining to hear sounds that everyone around can hear, as well as feeling “lost” when in the midst of a group conversation. Tinnitus symptoms include hearing a roaring, buzzing or clicking noise, so if any of these manifest consult an ENT specialist. Continue reading

How Drinking Affects Hearing

How Drinking Affects Hearing

 

There’s nothing quite like celebrating a special occasion with a glass of wine or a bottle of beer, but if you drink too much alcohol, it’s not just your liver at risk but hearing as well. According to hearing healthcare professionals, too much drinking can damage the auditory cortex in the brain and shrink it.

 

Drinking and the Brain

The auditory nerve is responsible for transmitting auditory data to your brain from the cochlea. What this means is there’s the possibility that your brain won’t be able to process the information even though your ears are healthy. In addition, there’s evidence which shows that drinking too much alcohol produces an unhealthy environment in your ears, causing hair cell damage. Continue reading

Cigarettes Linked to Hearing Loss

Cigarettes Linked to Hearing Loss

 

You’re probably aware that smoking leads to cancer, heart disease, respiratory problems and so on. Now you can add hearing loss to the list as studies show smokers are more likely to need hearing aids than nonsmokers.

 

What the Studies Show

As far back as 1962, hearing health experts suspected that cigarettes were responsible for many cases of hearing loss, and now the latest research confirms it. In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, smokers have a 70% greater chance to suffer hearing loss than nonsmokers, and nonsmokers are twice likely to maintain healthy hearing for the long term. Continue reading

Why Teachers are Vulnerable to Hearing Problems

Why Teachers are Vulnerable to Hearing Problems

 

According to a study by EPIC Hearing Healthcare, teachers are among the most susceptible to hearing loss, with 15% diagnosed with varying degrees of hearing problems compared to 11% of other workers. This might seem unusual, but a close look at their working environment can explain it.

 

Why Teachers?

For starters, teachers tend to work in noisy places, and the sounds emanating from the hallways –and the classroom- can strain the ears since it happens every day. To give you an idea of how difficult this is, imagine the headaches that you get trying to handle your children. Now instead of just one or two kids, imagine 25 or more in one room, from morning to afternoon every day. Continue reading